TACTICAL PSYCHOLOGY WORKSHOP

Use the powerful psychology behind the world’s top communities to increase engagement from your employees, clients, and customers

WHERE

OFFSITE Loft NYC

10 East 33rd Street, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10016

WHEN

JUNE 6, 2016

9:00am – 5:00pm

WHO

Richard Millington

FeverBee Founder

Learn how to apply proven principles from social psychology to increase the level of growth and participation in your community.

If you don’t have the level of engagement you want (or you just want a boost), you need to understand how people think, what motivates them, and the advanced social sciences you can apply to satisfy their motivations.

Our mission is to equip you with an advanced understanding of the social sciences you can use to immediately drive more activity in your community and change the behavior of your audience.

Our past 2 workshops in San Francisco and London sold out and averaged an incredible 94% approval rating.

This year, on June 6, we’re hosting our first ever workshop in New York City. This workshop will be taught by FeverBee’s founder, and the author of Buzzing Communities, Richard Millington.

What You Will Learn

The workshop is divided into four sessions (motivation, decision-design, persuasion, and communication techniques). Each session is focused on a unique psychological principal.Why our efforts to motivate contributions usually fall flat.

  • How to identify specifically what motivates members.
  • How to deploy motivational CTAs throughout your community.
  • How to nudge people to make decisions that benefit the community.
  • Why we fail so badly at persuasion.
  • How to persuade members to do what you want.
  • Communication techniques used by top experts.

Each of these are new skills you can use not only for your current community, but for any future community you ever work on.

We’re going to take a lot of complex psychology and distill it into very specific tactics you can implement the next day.

The early-bird fee is $625 per person. This fee includes:

  • The full day workshop at the Offsite Loft in the center of New York City.
  • Breakfast, lunch, coffee, and snacks during the day.
  • Our full workshop resources package.
  • Access  to  all  the  videos  from  previous  SPRINT  events  (40+  hours  of footage).

If you want to sign up, click here.

We have 30 seats available.

(Full agenda below)

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REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST

9.00am to 9:30am

Join us from 9.00am for breakfast and get to meet community managers from across New York.

SESSION 1: PERSUASION

9:30am to 11:00am

Our first session of the day covers persuasion. We spend almost every moment in our communities trying to persuade members to take actions which benefit the community. But, sadly, most of this time is wasted because it doesn’t embrace the key, psychological, elements involved in persuasion.

We’re going to explain how to identify the values, attitudes, and opinions of your members. Then we’re going to help you design your persuasion appeals (both emails, newsletters, discussions, and at the direct messages level) to get the outcome you need.

This session covers:

Behavioral Disposition

How are members currently predisposed to behave? What would happen if you didn’t exist? Why would members perform in this way? How do you get to the bottom of a member’s current behavior?

Values

What are values and why do they matter? How do we identify the value clusters that members hold within our communities? How do values shape the activities we initiate and the messages we send to members?

Attitudes

We’re going to guide you through the 3 key components of attitudes. We’re going to isolate which of these components we can change and which we cannot change. We’re also going to cover the biggest mistakes here when we try to persuade members to do anything. This is going to look at the different cognitive, affective, and behavioral levels you need to work on to persuade members to do anything.

Opinions

What’s the significance of opinions and stated community sentiment? How do we track this and what specific words do we need to look for here? Do we need to change opinions to change behavior? If so, how do we set about changing opinions?

Credibility

By far one of the most important elements in any persuasion effort is your own credibility. This session will cover what techniques you can use to drive higher levels of contribution. How do you increase your own perceived credibility among the audience? What templates can you follow from those who have done it in the past?

Proven Appeals

This covers the playbook of proven appeals and persuasion efforts that have been used to drive positive results in the past. We look at how different organizations have persuaded their members to take positive steps in the past after changing their attitude towards the object.

By the end of this session you will have a clear process to begin persuading members to do what you need them to do. This is a valuable skill you can use in any group change effort you ever embark upon. This session will also equip you with links to our own data gathering and research techniques.

SESSION 2: MIND HACKS AND COGNITIVE BIASES

11:30am to 1:00pm

After a 30-minute break for fruit, nuts, and coffee we’ll resume to tackle the most fun part of the day, mind hacks and irrational biases.

The human brain uses a wide array of heuristics to make decisions. These are mental shortcuts that simplify most of the decisions we need to make. It reduces the inputs we pay attention to.

We’re going to explain dozens of these and how you can hijack our basic human instincts to get members to do what you want. You’re going to learn the principles of nudging members, building habits, anchoring decisions, and personifying influence.

Key elements of this session include:

Human decision making

How we decide what we’re going to do and why we usually get it completely wrong. How you can help members to decide to join the community, become a volunteer, and use tools like contrasts and scarcity.

Anchoring decisions

We’re going to explain the concept of anchoring. How we make decisions and rate objects by contract in comparison with other objects, the role of emotion (and what stimulates emotion), and how to set the right expectations for members when they join.

Habits

You’ve probably read the work of BJ Fogg and Nir Eyal, we’re going to cover this but expand to show how it’s being regularly implemented in dozens of thriving online communities today.

Influence

The more influential you and your members are, the more people are likely to join. If you want to get more people joining and participating in your community, you need to grow your own influence. We’re going to highlight the key attributes of influence and how you can acquire them.

During this session we will once again break participants down into size and topic related groups (so you’re with people in similar fields) and help you to go through your own communities and push each member of the group through a checklist to ensure you’re optimizing each element of human decision making, anchoring, habits, and influence.

LUNCH

1:00pm to 2:00pm

SESSION 3: EMBRACING MOTIVATION

2:00pm to 3:30pm

Our third session of the day covers motivation. We’re going to take you through a brief history of motivation theory and how it applies to online communities. You’re going to learn how to get into your members’ heads and know exactly what they want (and why what they think they want isn’t always what they want). You’re also going to discover how most communities have inadvertently been developed to attract lurkers instead of cultivating active participants.

Key elements of this session include:

Motivation in online communities (what the research says).

Academics have studied motivation in online communities for two decades now. We’re going to cover and synthesize this research

Motivation by community (different types of communities embrace different types of motivation).

Motivation changes by the type of community. We’re going to explain what type of motivation will work best for your type of community.

Reading your members’ minds.

You’re going to learn the best techniques to identify what motivates your members to both join and participate in your community. You’re going to discover that what members say they want and what they really want are two very different things.

How to transfer motivation hook into practical CTAs.

We’re going to break you down into groups by the type of community you manage, then work with each group to develop effective motivational appeals you can test and apply throughout all your communications with members.

By the end of this session you will have a clear process to begin persuading members to do what you need them to do. This is a valuable skill you can use in any group change effort you ever embark upon. This session will also equip you with links to our own data gathering and research techniques.

SESSION 4: ADVANCED COMMUNICATION SKILLS

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Our final session boldly goes where few community professionals have gone before, persuasive communication. We’re going to take an evidence-based approach to explaining how you can communicate your ideas and messages persuasively to an audience. This will cover key elements from storytelling, creating a narrative, rhetoric, and the top tips from the greatest speechwriters.

You’re going to learn how to get the attention of the top people in your field, how to get your e-mails not just opened, but read, and how to select the specific words and messages you use to communicate with every member.

What not to say.

Every word we use comes with distinct associations for unique groups. We’re going to go through most of the common mistakes that undermine our efforts to build a community. We’re going to cover the different types of priming and how we can use priming to encourage the kind of behaviors we want.

Rallying a crowd.

We’ll look at the elements of rhetoric which are as useful online as they are offline. We’ll figure out the most common tactics used by the best public speakers in the business. We’ll learn the art of the pause, repetition, 3-point lists, and plenty more.

Perfecting the call to action.

Which calls to action are proven to work and which aren’t? What does the data say? How can you change what you ask members? Should you give a rationale? Highlight the end result? Or explain what it means to them or to others?

E-mail subject lines and newsletter headings.

Should the headline aim to capture attention or reflect the body content? How long should the headline or subject be? Which factors most determine whether a message gets opened? We’ll review the data on what words and length actually drives open-rates and participation.

During this session we will once again break participants down into size and topic related groups (so you’re with people in similar fields) and help you to go through your own communities and push each member of the group through a checklist to ensure you’re optimizing each element of human decision making, anchoring, habits, and influence.

BOOK YOUR TICKETS EARLY

Our workshops have sold out early for the past 2 years. If you book your tickets before May 1, you will receive a 30% discount.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

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